BIM2010_TrudyandcalfToday’s winter dolphin trip was spectacular. Nowdla Keefe had small group of passengers and everyone was thrilled that the sun was shining and the seas were calm. On the way out of the harbor we passed a shark, but our thoughts were on dolphins. We were busy early as a small group of bottlenose dolphins appeared to be feeding. They had no interest in the boat, so after everyone got a good look (and I got some ID shots) we headed in search of spotteds. We were not disappointed! It was a special day as we were able to observe a group of eight dolphins – 4 moms and 4 calves. Trudy (#57, pictured here) and Stefran (#82) appeared to have the older two calves, while Lone Star (#56) and a mystery adult had particularly young babies. We watched them from the boat and eased our way into the water. At first the calves seemed quite eager to check us out and then we got to see the moms. During our second water entry, they had paired up and were slowly swimming toward the sea floor. 

On the way home we got to check out a good sized shark (tiger?) from the safety of the boat and a bonus look at bottlenose dolphins again. We couldn’t have asked for a better day! 

Until next time,

Kel

Bimini2010_T1Today was the first dolphin trip of 2010 and it was a fantastic day. Bill & Nowdla had a small, but excited group of passengers and we were all ready to see the dolphins. The seas were flat, the sun was shining and it wasn’t long before Nowdla spotted them – the spotted dolphins, that is! The boat headed toward them and we soon saw Lil’ Jess (#35), White Blotch (#29) and White Blotch’s calf, ID#94. The length of their bond is definitely on the long side of average; #94 is now 5 ½ years old and still hanging close with mom! White Blotch did not show any signs of being pregnant again yet either. There was a fourth adult spotted in the group, but even though I got a close look at it, I couldn’t readily identify it. Hopefully I’ll know once I review the video. During the trip we had two great underwater encounters – the dolphins came very close, especially Lil’ Jess and #94, who are pictured here (Lil' Jess is closest to the camera). In between our swims everyone also got a great show while the dolphins rode the bow of the boat. What a day! 

Until next time,

Kel

Bimini09_T66_Tt38New Year’s Day was spent sorting through photographs from the past week’s dolphin trips. I am thrilled to start the new year with a new bottlenose dolphin! Welcome Tt38! The Tt in the ID code stands for Tursiops truncatus, the Latin (aka scientific) name for bottlenose dolphins. This allows us to immediately reference the species – so we don’t confuse Tt38 with Atlantic spotted dolphin #38 (“Cerra”). Tt38 was seen in a spotted dolphin group, however there did not appear to be too much direct interaction. 

 

I hope we see more of Tt38 in 2010! -Kel

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