Bimini 2008 Sf Grp T48

Well folks, it has been a busy week!  Wednesday the seas remained a bit rough, but not nearly as uncomfortable as Tuesday.  And our dedication paid off, because we saw the ultimate dolphin group.  There were over 30 Atlantic spotted dolphins together!!  We rarely see a group this large and often, when we do, they are too interested in themselves to allow us to observe them underwater.  Today we were lucky enough to see the majority of the group.  In this photo you can easily see Lone Star (#56) – she’s the adult toward the bottom with mangled dorsal & pectoral fins.  Also in the group were...

Read more: Dolphins galore

 

 Yesterday we were able to observe Romeo (#10), Lone Star (#56), Leslie (#80) and un-named #87.  I was able to record nearly 20 minutes of underwater data before the dolphins swam away.  Today began with some office work and then it was off to chat with this week’s passengers.  It was a small, but very interested group – thank you for all of your enthusiasm & questions!  We left the dock shortly after 1630, but we were soon battling some big swells.  We had to retreat to calmer waters closer to shore.  Unfortunately, despite all of our excitement we did not see any dolphins over the white caps.  Hopefully tomorrow will bring calmer seas – and dolphins!  

Until then, 

Kel

Bimini 2008 Swoosh first calf

 

Everyone, I’d like you to meet the first offspring of Swoosh (ID#36)!  The new mother-calf pair was spotted twice this week; hopefully those are the first of many sightings.  The young male cannot be added to our photo-ID catalog though, because he has no re-identifiable markings.   

Yesterday’s trip was a success and today I’ve been off the boat, catching up on office tasks, such as manuscript editing & field reports.  I hope you enjoy them!

 

Read more: Say hello to Swoosh Baby

 This morning’s presentation to passengers went very well – thank you everyone!  Many of this week’s guests were here last week, so we were able to build upon many of the ideas & experiences surrounding the dolphins.  We left the dock at 1530 and although we were able to observe a group of dolphins for over 1 hour, they were not interested in sticking around for us to observe them under water.  Hopefully tomorrow will be different!  For those of you keeping track, included in today’s group were Lil’ Jess (#35), Cerra (#38), Stefran (#82) and un-named #86.   

Until next time,

Kel

 Bimini 2008 Tt dsl

Monday we spent another afternoon on the boat.  Tuesday began with a presentation to students & instructors from the Chicago City Day School aboard the Coral Reef II.  They were a great audience – thank you!!  It was a quick transition to boat & we headed out of the harbor at 1300.  We needed to skirt some squalls, but we managed to stay mostly dry & far from the thunder & lightning.  I didn’t get any underwater data, but we did observe 3 sub-groups of spotted dolphins and a group of bottlenose dolphins.  Pictured here is likely a new bottlenose dolphin for our ID catalog – but first, I’ll have to check if the big notch is possibly a new notch on an "old" animal.  Read more: A busy, squall-y day

Today’s field report will be a bit short and photo-less, but I’ll make up for it later in the week, I promise.  Saturday we had an impromptu dolphin trip with a small group of passengers.  We saw plenty of dolphins, but none who wanted to be observed under water.  I’ll have to see if any of the surface photographs were clear enough to be used for ID purposes.  Today, we waited patiently for a group of 10 dolphins, who again, wanted nothing to do with underwater observations.  But, then came a smaller group including un-named #78 & 87 and....drum roll please....Swoosh (#36) with....second drum roll please...HER FIRST CALF!!!  I have to admit, I did not see any nursing, but the ~9 month old, male youngster was in close proximity to Swoosh and she had swollen mammaries!  If I can manage to pull a still image from the underwater video, I will share it later in the week.  Congratulations Swoosh!! 

Until tomorrow,

Kel

 

Leaping C2-3 Bimini 2008Yesterday was another exceptionally calm day, but we did need to be a bit more patient to see the dolphins.  We saw them shortly after 1800.  It was a group of 12 Atlantic spotted dolphins, including this little one leaping!

 

The group was moving too fast to observe them underwater, but we did follow them for over 1 hour and I was actually able to capture usable ID photos from the surface.  That is rare for the spotted dolphins, whose spot patterns are used for ID purposes.  Read more: Calm Again

 

 Yesterday was amazing.  The sea was so flat, it felt as if Bimini 2008 Tt fluke

we could see all the way to Africa.  But, luckily, we barely

needed to leave the harbor in order to see dolphins!  We began the day at 1536 and by 1603 we were in the midst of nearly 20 bottlenose dolphins.  I chose to stay aboard the boat & focus on capturing dorsal fin photographs for photo-ID.  Among were several nurse sharks, which is typical while the dolphins feed.  They dolphins were busy; it appeared that they were feeding, but there was also a bit of socializing/mating going on.  After 40 minutes of observation, we headed out in search of spotteds...And spotteds we found. Read more: Could there BE any more dolphins?

 Well, yesterday was Tabby & Adam’s last full day in Bimini – and it was a busy one!  With some office tasks tackled early we headed to our weekly presentation (thank you passengers!) at 1030.  Then it was on boat at 1300.  There was an extended snorkel stopped planned, so we prepared for a long day on the boat.  We were not disappointed as we saw many dolphins.  Click below (Read More) to hear about the rest of our day or click Shop > Adopt-a-Dolphin from the menu above to find out how you can support DCP by becoming a spotted dolphin parent today!

Read more: Goodbye Interns

 

Although we only gathered a short clip of video data, we did have a long day of observing Atlantic spotted dolphins.  We came upon three separate sub-groups of mostly adults & sub-adults – who were much more interested in themselves than us as they cruised south at 3 knots in a busy mating ball.  This is always cool to watch, although a bit disappointed not to have the underwater view. 

But, we did see: Buster (#04), Lumpy (#17), Split Jaw (#22), Lone Star (#56), Billy (#64), un-named #78, 79 & 87.  Very busy! 

Until tomorrow,

Kel, Tabby & Adam

 

Bimini ID25

 

Today we were happily back on the ocean.  It was a full boat with scattered dolphins all about, including Freckles (#15), Cerra (#38), Lone Star (#56), un-named #25 and plenty of calves.  Tabby & Adam were able to collect some great still photographs for the ID catalog.  Everyone:  Meet Bimini Atlantic spotted dolphin ID#25! Read more: After a week on land, today we were back on the boat

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