Check out the latest news from DCP, including field reports filed by our researchers busy doing science at one of our many research sites.

Twenty Two Fantastical Facts about Dolphins – my new book!
29 Nov 2015

Twenty Two Fantastical Facts about Dolphins – my new book!

Dear friends, I am super psyched to announce the publication of my latest book, Twenty Two Fantastical Facts about Dolphins! You can purchase a copy of the book for just $9.99 ($3.99 on Kindle) on Amazon.com at this link, or on bol.com, Amazon.de, Amazon.co.uk, and kobo. It's full of fun dolphin science trivia, and is aimed at kids/grown-ups aged 12 and over. If you like the fun kind of dolphin science info featured on DCP's podcast, The Dolphin Pod, you will surely love this book too! Happy reading! -Justin Here's the official press release: New book of dolphin science trivia for young adults Stuff you didn’t know you didn’t know about dolphins Antigonish, Nova Scotia, November 30, 2015 – Did…

Holiday Specials Are Here!

DCP is offering two special holiday gift offers at no extra cost to you! Special #1: buy a print version adoption kit between today (Black Friday) and Friday, Dec. 4th, to receive 4 extra randomly selected dolphin trading cards! Special #2: Buy an adoption e-kit between today (Black Friday) and the end of the year (Dec. 31, 2015) and receive a download link to a special video of underwater nature footage. Head to www.adoptawilddolphin.com right now to order your kit with bonus specials automatically included!

Thankful for ChameleonJohn.com

Happy Thanksgiving from DCP! This year, we are once again thankful for all of our supporters and today we add ChameleonJohn.com, a US-based online coupon company, to that list. We are grateful to be a part of ChameleonJohn’s current campaign to help non-profits. Thank you, ChameleonJohn.com! If your company is interested in becoming a corporate sponsor of DCP, please contact us at info{at}dcpmail{dot}org. If you are interested in making a donation – whether a one-time show of support or monthly commitment – head to our Donate page under the “Ways to Help” menu. PS: You only have until 1 December to get your limited-edition “Love Dolphins?” tee or sweatshirt! Click here to check them out and make your purchase!
Dolphins sometimes carry weapons
25 Nov 2015

Dolphins sometimes carry weapons

*The following blog post is an excerpt from the book Twenty-Two Fantastical Facts about Dolphins* Psychologists have learned that holding an otherwise innocent object in your hand – like an umbrella – makes onlookers perceive you as more dangerous than if you were empty-handed. This same, subconscious fear of weapon-like objects is lodged in the minds of many of our primate cousins. Our closest relatives – chimpanzees – appeal to this weapon-fear bias by waving tree branches and logs in the air when trying to make themselves look larger and more intimidating. And by golly it works. As anyone who has spent time in the African jungles can attest to, a giant male chimpanzee screaming and running at you with…
Dolphins don't sleep
23 Nov 2015

Dolphins don't sleep

*The following blog post is an excerpt from the book Twenty-Two Fantastical Facts about Dolphins* Almost all animals that live in the ocean are able to breathe water – extracting the life-giving oxygen that’s swishing around in seawater with their gills. Crustaceans, fish, clams, amphibians – they all have gills, and don’t need (and generally prefer to avoid) air. But marine mammals – which include dolphins, whales, seals, manatees, sea lions, otters and a handful of others – still need access to air in order to get their oxygen. The ancestors of all marine mammals were air-breathing land-animals, and during their millions-of-years-long return to the ocean, none of them bothered to evolve gills or other anatomical features that would allow…
Dolphins almost never drown
18 Nov 2015

Dolphins almost never drown

*The following blog post is an excerpt from the book Twenty-Two Fantastical Facts about Dolphins* Being an air-breathing animal living in the ocean brings with it a number of challenges. Chief among them is trying not to drown. The paradox/problem of living in an aquatic environment but needing to be at the surface to breathe is something that manatees, sea turtles, whales, and dolphins have to cope with on a daily basis. But for dolphins, drowning in the traditional sense (which involves inhaling water into your lungs) is not really the problem. Dolphins, you see, are sort of immune to drowning. I know what you’re thinking. This sounds like crazy nonsense. Don’t hundreds of thousands of dolphins drown in fishing…
Dolphins sometimes have backward dorsal fins
16 Nov 2015

Dolphins sometimes have backward dorsal fins

*The following blog post is an excerpt from the book Twenty-Two Fantastical Facts about Dolphins* Spinner dolphins are pretty bizarre as far as dolphins go. Their habit of leaping out of the water and spinning around at high velocity is just odd – not something other species of dolphins usually do. It’s made even more bizarre by the fact that nobody knows why they do it. It might be to shake off pesky suckerfish that are latched onto their sensitive skin. Or maybe it’s a form of communication, or a mating display. Or, as is likely the case for lots of dolphin behavior, it’s just something fun to do. It’s not just that spinner dolphins act strange. They also look…
Dolphins have ears in their jaws
13 Nov 2015

Dolphins have ears in their jaws

*The following blog post is an excerpt from the book Twenty-Two Fantastical Facts about Dolphins* Whales and dolphins evolved from furry mammals with hoof-like feet that roamed the Earth 50 million years ago. Called Pakicetus, these animals looked like a cross between a dog, a cat, and a tiny, angry hippopotamus. They walked on four legs, had a snout with eyes on the front of their heads, and sported cute little gerbil-like ears. As natural selection began the process of transforming Pakicetus into the modern-day dolphin, the ancestors of dolphins lost many anatomical features that weren’t helpful to them in their new aquatic environment. They traded in their body hair for a thick layer of blubber to help keep them…

Love Dolphins?

Now is your chance to scoop up DCP's latest limited-edition tees & sweatshirts! These shirts are only available until 1 December so don't forget to order yours! And while you're at it, grab a few for your friends! https://www.bonfirefunds.com/love-dolphins

DCP 2015 RIMS Reseach Video

Curious about our recent research trip to the Roatan Institute for Marine Sciences (RIMS)? Check out our latest research video! https://vimeo.com/144932875?utm_source=email&utm_medium=vimeo-cliptranscode-201504&utm_campaign=28749 A big thank you to John Anderson of Terramar Productions!
DCP's RIMS 2015 Data Summary
02 Nov 2015

DCP's RIMS 2015 Data Summary

Our 2015 field session at Anthony's Key Resort's Roatan Institute for Marine Science (RIMS) was a success! We were able to collect six hours of video with the MVA2 camera as well as another ~9 hours of video with 1-2 GoPro cameras. That is, for all sessions, one GoPro was mounted above the MVA 2 facing forward to provide a wider view and greater area for confirming dolphin IDs from body parts that might be slightly out of view on the MVA camera but in range on the GoPro. And, for about 1/3 to 1/2 of the sessions, we also borrowed Bill's GoPro and placed it atop the MVA2 but pointing at me/behind me. This allowed us to see who…
Our Last Day - data and a swim!
31 Oct 2015

Our Last Day - data and a swim!

Today, Friday, dawned bright after an evening of thunderstorms that affected the early AM underwater visibility. Still, I was able to collect data during an early morning session and a second morning session on our last day at RIMS/AKR for 2015. Champ and Calli were as attentive as ever to me in the early morning as were French, Ronnie and Ritchie. Even Bailey spent a bit of time investigating the hydrophones. The second morning session brought better underwater visibility (up to ~3.5 meters but still silty). And, I was able to observe Paya and Maury swimming together in a group that also included Beasley, Alita, Gracie and Tilly. Tilly is growing by leaps and bounds but still hangs more with…
Our Mornings Start Early!
30 Oct 2015

Our Mornings Start Early!

Even as our week begins to wind down, our mornings start early. This DCP team is a group of early risers! Perfect for catching the morning sun, best underwater visibility and social dolphins! You can see everyone preparing to take their positions around the enclosure for the best observer positions ... and maybe also for the occasional game of seaweed toss with the younger dolphins! This morning presented the best underwater clarity of the week, so far. Very little silt or precipitate in the water, clear for at least 6 m ... and also social dolphins. Of course, Polly, Calli and Champ were my buddies for much of the session. They are enamored of my fins! (and sometimes of my…
Dolphins and Trainers and Photo ID
29 Oct 2015

Dolphins and Trainers and Photo ID

Observing the dolphins underwater and recording their behavior onto video cards or tapes equates to also being required to recognize each dolphin by her/his scars and marks. For the most part, here at RIMS/AKR, we can use the rake marks that are caused by other dolphin teeth during play or aggression. These rake marks are parallel white lines. They heal pretty quickly, but will remain for the week of data collection. Coordinating with the trainers to confirm each dolphin's marks is key to being able to readily recognize the dolphins. Our team spent time yesterday and today photographing each dolphin from the left, right, top and bottom (aka, ventrally) to log their marks photographically. This will help immensely when we…
It's All about Perspective!
28 Oct 2015

It's All about Perspective!

This morning saw the MVA2 (second array built) with a second added camera! Typically, we have a GoPro mounted on the left top of the housing to get a wider perspective and be able to confirm IDs of all the dolphins visible in the view finder. This morning, John decided to add a second GoPro (Thanks Bill, for the loan!) to get a view behind me to see who and how many are watching the observer! I was still not able to "see" the dolphins behind me during filming, but review of the footage after the session provided numerous laughs for everyone on our team! Polly and Calli often seemed to think they were "sneaking up" on me (even though…

Contact Us

Write to us via snail-mail at:

Dolphin Communication Project
P.O. Box 7485
Port St. Lucie, FL, 34985
USA

Email us:

info {at} dcpmail {dot} org

THE DOLPHIN COMMUNICATION PROJECT CHARITABLE SOLICITATION NUMBER CH42894, MEETS ALL REQUIREMENTS SPECIFIED BY THE FLORIDA SOLICITATION OF CONTRIBUTIONS ACT.  A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE (800-435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE OF FLORIDA, OR 850-410-3800 WHEN CALLING OUTSIDE THE STATE.  REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.

Connect with us

Join us on Facebook